How to Create a Good Discussion Chapter

When you have the main part of your research results done, the next step you should take is to use them in the discussion chapter. In other words, it is the high time to provide the discussion of the obtained results. Discussion chapter is another essential part of every dissertation or thesis. Here you need to put all your results into the context and give them the meaning. In fact, it becomes the main reason why a lot of students start feeling that they will not be able to handle such task.    

What is the aim of the discussion in the dissertation

  • It is written to interpret the information and provide the results explanation;
  • It provide a comparison of results and already existing studies conducted in the selected field; 
  • It helps to highlight any existing limitations in the research;
  • It helps to estimate the importance of the study;
  • It helps to draw attention to areas or any questions for future research work.

What will readers see in the discussion chapter?

  • Whether the conducted research fits the writer’s original goals;
  • How these goals are confirmed in the dissertation;
  • How the writer provides an explanation of the acquired results;
  • Whether the conducted research is relevant to already existing research works and  theories;
  • Any areas that require improvement or any research limitations;  
  • The importance of the conducted research work.
 

What kind of data should be included in the discussion chapter?

  • Summary of the main findings and results;
  • How the obtained results match writer’s initial goal;
  • The reconfirmation of initial goals;
  • The description of how the conducted research can be compared to already existing research and theories;
  • Clear explanation of any unexpected results;
  • Possible research limitations;
  • Recommendations for further research work.

What should be omitted in the discussion chapter?

  • Any information that has not been provided in the results chapter;
  • Less significant findings;
  • Results that are not related to or cannot confirm the hypothesis or your original goals; 
  • In most cases, any tables or diagrams should be provided in the results chapter.  

How should the information be structured?

There are many ways to structure the information:

  • You can address the goals and hypothesis in exactly the same order they are provided in the introduction part;
  • Start presenting the most significant results and findings with a clear comment on them. After that, less significant information can be presented. 
  • Follow the first or the second section provided above.
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